Beloved Estonian writer Oskar Luts had the Dickensian ability to create characters so vividly that we take them to have really existed. To some their names are even more familiar than those from history books. One such character is the cantor of Paunvere, or Julk-Jüri, as he is dismissively called in „Spring“ (1913) by the students. Who of us does not know this fellow?

At the same time, Luts does not give a lot of information in terms of the background of the character. We know the cantor as a mean and ill-tempered man who taught bible studies to the kids in Paunvere. But what was his past like? Who were his parents? What did the cantor look like as a young boy? Such questions inevitably make us wonder...

The figure of the cantor urges us to think about what it means to grow up. Looking at middle-aged folks it is sometimes hard to believe that they might have had their days having fun dancing or believing in fairy-tales. What happens to the child in us? How do some people manage to sustain it? Or does the child exist in all of us, only hidden deep-deep inside...

The solo performance „Cantor“ by famed Estonian playwright Andrus Kivirähk premieres on the international Knowledge Day, September 1, 2016 at the Horse Mill venue at Tallinn City Theatre.